Tag Archives: Policy analysis

Pamela Tom-Jack (2014 – 2016), MA, Univ. of Ottawa

MA, Major Research Paper (Graduate School in Public & International Affairs): The Evolving Geopolitical Relations of Nigeria and China: What is the impact of the Nigeria-China trade and direct investment on the Nigerian economy?

04645bcABSTRACT:
This paper examines the growing economic relations between Nigeria and China with the aim of providing more information on the true impacts of their bilateral trade expansion on the Nigerian economy, both at the domestic and international level through the lenses of authors of various literature reviews.
In order to perform this assessment, this paper will examine the history of Chinese penetration into Nigeria and its industries in comparison to other Western investors. This research evaluates current trade statistics between both countries. Data was collected mainly from secondary sources.
Nigeria and China have had a longstanding relationship founded on a strategic partnership to promote a South-South cooperation, development and growth of their economies. The conclusion is that there is a neo classical dependency theory that Chinese growth and development model is beneficial for the Nigerian economy and China’s expansion in Africa is not a new form of colonialism. However, Nigeria needs to create more employment opportunities for its local population by reducing the number of the Chinese workers through a process of skills and acquisition transfer.

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John-Eric Teehan (2014 – 2015), MA, Univ. of Ottaw

MA, Major Research Paper:  Towards a New Green Revolution? Exploring Competing Approaches to Food Security In the Aftermath of Malawi’s Agriculture Success Story. (Jan. 2014 – Dec. 2015)

aaeaaqaaaaaaaaiyaaaajdu3ywjkn2u0ltjknwitndriny1hytjjlwi5zji1zdyxmzcxmwABSTRACT:
In Sub-Saharan Africa, most of the workforce is employed in agriculture and the majority of the poorest households depend on farming for their livelihoods.  In Malawi, low food production has led to chronic food crises and famines as domestic food production collapsed nationally in 1992, 1994, and 2004. In response to these shortages a Fertilizer Input Subsidy Program (FISP) was introduced in 2005 by the Government of Malawi to increase the ability of small-holder farmers to generate yields and improve food security nationwide. Hailed as a prime example of the “New Green Revolution” and often viewed as a success story, this paper analyzes FISP’s challenges and limitations. It reviews FISP within the context of a food security theoretical framework, and explores alternative and experimental policy interventions for achieving food security, including agroecology and social protection programs. Specifically, this research paper argues that while the implementation of FISP increased food availability at the national level, it did not fully address issues of food access, utilization, financial and ecological sustainability, and beneficiary targeting.  Therefore, FISP constitutes only a partial solution to food insecurity in Malawi. A multipronged, balanced approach that includes agroecological initiatives and social protection programs that target different groups with different interventions could provide a more effective, efficient, and holistic approach to food security.

Download the full Major Research Paper here.

Equitable Alternatives and Local Solutions to Land Grabs in Africa

Tuesday 24 March 2015 (10 am to 12 noon)

U. Ottawa, Social Science Bldg (120 University Priv), Room 4007

Panel Discussion moderated by Adrian Harewood (@CBCAdrianH)

  • Faris Ahmed (Director of Policy, USC Canada)
  • Samuel Bonti-Ankomah (Carleton Univ.)
  • Annie Brunton (MA Student, SIDGS, uOttawa)
  • Roy Culpeper (Chair, CELADA)
  • Joshua Ramisch (uOttawa)
  • Blair Rutherford (Carleton Univ.)

Organized by :

  • CELADA (Coalition for Equitable Land Acquisitions in Africa ) – celada.ca
  • SIDGS (School of International Development & Global Studies, uOttawa) – website here.

Joshua speaks during the panel
Speaking during the panel on “Alternatives to Landgrabs” (24 Mar. 2015) [Photo credit: Eshete]
I will post links to the panel materials after the event.  In the meantime, if you are concerned with the rise of inequitable acquisitions of land in Africa and how they are displacing farmers and pastoralists, visit the CELADA resource page for possible actions.

One strategy is by emailing your MP. Persuade them to support CELADA’s aims by explaining why you believe Canada should take a leading role in challenging inequitable land acquisitions in Africa.

Nathalie Rainville (2011-2014), MA, Univ. of Ottawa

Major Research Paper (MRP): Women at the Center of Food Security in Ghana? An analysis of National Investment Plans’ Support of Women in Agricultural Development.   (2011 – Aug. 2014).

METASIP (sm)
The Government of Ghana’s national investment plan was compared with IFAD’s support plan for how they framed the role of women farmers

ABSTRACT:

Women farmers in Ghana are responsible for 80% of agricultural output and make up the majority of the population who is concerned with household nutrition and food security. Yet, this study of the government of Ghana’s Medium term Agricultural Investment Program (METASIP) and IFAD’s Country Strategic Operations Program for Ghana (COSOP) did not find any evidence that point to these labor statistics or women producers’ potential as leaders in agricultural development. Rather, the findings point to strong support for the private sector as the knowledge holders to modernize Ghana’s agriculture industry, despite strong gender equality policy dialogue advocating for shifts in gender dynamics, which would empower female producers as entrepreneurs and decision-makers. This study concludes that future studies need to delve into this disconnect between the gender mainstreaming policies that promote power shifts in gendered relations and the disempowering agricultural development programs and cooperation practices that are actually implemented in the West African context.

Download the full Major Research Paper here.  For more information contact me.

Envisioning Just and Sustainable Agro-Food Systems: Actors, Principles and Approaches

The first colloquium of the Laboratory for the Interdisciplinary Study of Food (LISF) was held on 4 April 2014 (full programme here).  Local activists and researchers presented cutting edge work (in English and French) on:

  • Global and local food issues
  • How make universities’ food systems more just
  • Land grabbing and food security in Africa
  • Book launch of “Globalization and Food Sovereignty”